Photo - property of Richard Hickok - www.hickokfamilygenealogy.com
The wolf is a highly intelligent and social animal, this predator lives in small family units of about six animals. Generally, each group is dominated by the alpha male and female, which are also usually the pack's only breeding pair. The pack focuses on hunting communally, a strategy that allows the killing of large prey, and caring for the pups, which are their future. Because in most cases only one pair breeds per pack, every wolf takes some part in the caring for, defending, and feeding of the young. Food sharing is common. Leaders remain leaders only as long as they function well. It is a social system and hunting strategy so successful that the wolf has flourished wherever it has roamed. Only one other highly intelligent predator has either mimicked the wolf or evolved along the same lines.
THAT PREDATOR IS US....
Brother Wolf A Forgotten Promise
by Jim Brandendenburg
Please do not hate or fear the wolf, for the wolf is our brother, we are much closer than you think. The wolf has no reason to harm or kill you. The wolf will only kill for two reasons;

#1. Self defense, or to defend it's pup's.

#2. To eat, or to feed it's pup's.

I feel much safer in the woods when I'm surrounded by wild wolves running loose, than when I'm in the woods and there are strange people all around. I trust wolves.
Humans kill for no reason at at all!
WHO IS THE ANIMAL HERE?
Do they still call it HUNTING in Alaska or is it just plain SLAUGHTER!
PLEASE BOYCOTT ALASKA'S TOURISM
UNTIL THIS CRUEL PRACTICE HAS STOPPED
More Than 100 Scientists Oppose Aerial Gunning of Alaska Wolves
Alaska-based biologist, Dr. Victor Van Ballenberghe, has drafted a report commissioned by Defenders and supported by 123 scientists and academic wildlife professionals, which states that Alaska's current program of killing wolves from the air is scientifically flawed.
Read the full report here
BOYCOTT ALASKA
boycott-alaska.org boycott-alaska.org
To learn more about wolves and our connection with them, I recommend reading; Brother Wolf A Forgotten Promise
by Jim Brandendenburg
Enjoy the photographs...
Photo - property of Monty Sloan/Wolf Park Photo - property of Monty Sloan/Wolf Park
Wolves have a wonderful talent for howling at different pitches. Each wolf assumes a unique pitch to avoid duplicating another pack member's voice.
Photo - property of Richard Hickok - www.hickokfamilygenealogy.com Photo - property of Richard Hickok - www.hickokfamilygenealogy.com
Paleo-Indians were one of the first groups of early human hunters who had a partnership with the wolf. This relationship was mutually beneficial, and after their long association with the humans, Canis lupus, the wolf, became Canis familiaris, the dog. Archaeological evidence proves that humans and dogs lived together at least 12,000 years ago. Not all of the wolves were domesticated though, most of them remained wild. That is why today all domesticated dogs have the same DNA as a wolf. Today the only way to tell the difference between a wolf and a dog is by examining the enzymes or skulls.
Photo - property of Richard Hickok - www.hickokfamilygenealogy.com Photo - property of Monty Sloan/Wolf Park
After two months, the pups are moved out of the den to play and learn valuable hunting skills.
Photo - property of Richard Hickok - www.hickokfamilygenealogy.com
Photo - property of Richard Hickok - www.hickokfamilygenealogy.com
Wolf pups weigh only one pound and are blind and deaf at birth.
Photo - property of Monty Sloan/Wolf Park Photo - property of Monty Sloan/Wolf Park
Although born with black fir, the wolf pup replaces its neo-natal coloring with a white, tan, brown or a combination of colors.
Photo - property of Richard Hickok - www.hickokfamilygenealogy.com
Photo - property of Monty Sloan/Wolf Park
Like a human baby, a wolf pup cries when it is hungry or in pain.
Photo - property of Richard Hickok - www.hickokfamilygenealogy.com
Photo - property of Monty Sloan/Wolf Park
Photo - property of Richard Hickok - www.hickokfamilygenealogy.com
Photo - property of Richard Hickok - www.hickokfamilygenealogy.com
Photo - property of Richard Hickok - www.hickokfamilygenealogy.com
Photo - property of Richard Hickok - www.hickokfamilygenealogy.com
Photo - property of Richard Hickok - www.hickokfamilygenealogy.com
Photo - property of Monty Sloan/Wolf Park
Photo - property of Richard Hickok - www.hickokfamilygenealogy.com
Photo - property of Monty Sloan/Wolf Park
Photo - property of Monty Sloan/Wolf Park
Photo - property of Richard Hickok - www.hickokfamilygenealogy.com
From the beginning, humans and wolves were much alike. Both human tribes and wolf packs consisted largely of family units. Both rely on a strong social structure to govern society and the hunt - which in turn ensures survival of the society. Both elect their own leaders possessing great craft or physical prowess. And in both societies simple rituals reinforce relationships, maintain order, and enforce discipline.
Photo - property of Richard Hickok - www.hickokfamilygenealogy.com
Photo - property of Richard Hickok - www.hickokfamilygenealogy.com
Photo - property of Richard Hickok - www.hickokfamilygenealogy.com
Photo - property of Richard Hickok - www.hickokfamilygenealogy.com
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